Author Archive

Malliotakis Celebrates Greek Heritage at Staten Island’s Holy Trinity

by Malliotakis on | Featured

Greek Independence Day 2017
(from left to right) Rev. Protopresbyter Nicholas Petropoulakos, Presvytera Patricia Petropoulakos, Toula Lellos, and Assemblywoman Malliotakis.

Yesterday, Assemblywoman Nicole Malliotakis (R,C,I-Brooklyn, Staten Island) presented Assembly citations to Presvytera Patricia Petropoulakos and Toula Lellos, in recognition of their service to Staten Island’s Greek-American community, during her annual Greek Independence Day celebration at Holy Trinity-St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church in Staten Island. The 196th Anniversary of Greece’s independence from the Ottoman Empire will be formally celebrated on March 25th.

Presvytera Patricia Petropoulakos, wife of Holy Trinity Pastor Father Nick, was honored for her involvement in the Greek American community. Whether it is parish organizations, philanthropic activities, participation in the annual Greek festivals, bake sales, and so much more, “Presvytera Pat” has always been involved in some way.

Toula Lellos was born in Greece, came to the United States as a young woman, and married her husband, Athanasios. She raised three children, Vicky, Jimmy and Teddy and has 9 grandchildren (soon she will be a great-grandmother too). She currently serves as Holy Trinity’s church chanter, is involved in numerous activies and volunteers as a cook for the annual Greek Festival.

“The United States and Greece have a long-standing friendship dating back to when the United States gave Greece a military ship and its quest for freedom from the Ottoman Empire. This year also marks the 70th anniversary of the Truman Doctrine which supported Greece with military and financial assistance in the fight against communism. It is fitting that we recognize and celebrate our long-standing relationship by honoring members of our Greek American community. Both Presvytera Pat and Toula are very deserving and exemplify the wonderful contributions Greek Americans have made,” said Assemblywoman Malliotakis.
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Malliotakis Unveils List of 447 Crimes NYC ‘Sanctuary’ Policy Ignores

by Malliotakis on | Featured

After a brief exchange during Mayor Bill de Blasio’s testimony before the New York State Assembly budget hearing on “Local Governments”, Assemblywoman Nicole Malliotakis (R,C,I-Brooklyn, Staten Island) has formally requested that the Mayor explore making adjustments to the existing “sanctuary city” law that restricts the ability of the New York City Department of Corrections (DOC)  and the New York City Police Department (NYPD) to cooperate with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) on civil detainer requests.  During the budget hearing, de Blasio expressed a willingness to add crimes to the list of offenses that trigger cooperation.

“While I believe that municipal law enforcement agencies should comply with civil detainers for all criminal offenses, I think Mayor de Blasio and I can agree that crimes such as sexual abuse, forcible touching and patronizing of a minor for prostitution are serious offenses that should trigger a zero tolerance policy. Government’s first responsibility is to keep its citizens safe.  The city should not be harboring individuals who are not only here illegally but committing crimes against our citizenry as well,” said Malliotakis.

In 2014 the New York City Council enacted two resolutions, Local Law No. 58 and Local Law No. 59, to significantly impede cooperation between DOC, NYPD, and ICE, by prohibiting DOC and NYPD from honoring immigration detainers unless accompanied by a federal warrant and the person:

(1)        Has either been convicted of a violent or serious crime, or
(2)        Is identified as a possible match on in the terrorist screening database.

Crimes that are not considered “violent or serious” include Sexual Misconduct, Forcible Touching, Aggravated Identity Theft, and Permitting Prostitution, as well as various degrees of Sexual Abuse, Grand Larceny, Welfare Fraud, Aggravated Patronizing of Minor for Prostitution, and Promoting Prostitution, among others.   Malliotakis also noted that defendants charged with a “violent or serious” crime will often plea to a lower degree in exchange for a lesser sentence.

“During the Administration of President Barack Obama, ICE agents were advised to issue a detainer only where the individual was suspected of posing a danger to national security, affiliated with an organized criminal gang, convicted of a felony unrelated to immigration status, convicted of an aggravated felony, convicted of three or more misdemeanors unrelated to immigration status or minor traffic offenses, or convicted of a misdemeanor related to a sex offense, burglary, firearms, drugs, driving under the influence, or any offense requiring 90 days or more in police custody.  ICE limits the issuance of civil detainers to situations where the individual is considered dangerous or has already been convicted of breaking the law.  I am truly alarmed by the fact that the City of New York honored less than 2% of them,” the letter reads.  “I am sure you agree that we as elected officials must remain accountable to those we represent, and should never incentivize unlawful activity that hurts American families financially or, at worst, increases risk to our safety and security.”  

LetterToDeBlasio.CivilDetainers1.03092017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
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100.00 – Criminal solicitation in the fifth degree.
100.05 – Criminal solicitation in the fourth degree.
100.08 – Criminal solicitation in the third degree.
100.10 – Criminal solicitation in the second degree.
100.13 – Criminal solicitation in the first degree.
105.00 – Conspiracy in the sixth degree.
105.05 – Conspiracy in the fifth degree.
105.10 – Conspiracy in the fourth degree.
105.13 – Conspiracy in the third degree.
105.15 – Conspiracy in the second degree.
105.17 – Conspiracy in the first degree.
110.00 – Attempt to commit a crime.
115.00 – Criminal facilitation in the fourth degree.
115.01 – Criminal facilitation in the third degree.
115.05 – Criminal facilitation in the second degree.
115.08 – Criminal facilitation in the first degree.
120.00 – Assault in the third degree.
120.14 – Menacing in the second degree.
120.15 – Menacing in the third degree.
120.16 – Hazing in the first degree.
120.17 – Hazing in the second degree
120.20 – Reckless endangerment in the second degree.
120.30 – Promoting a suicide attempt.
120.35 – Promoting a suicide attempt; when punishable as attempt to commit murder.
120.45 – Stalking in the fourth degree.
120.50 – Stalking in the third degree.
121.11 – Criminal obstruction of breathing or blood circulation.
125.50 – Self-abortion in the second degree.
125.55 – Self-abortion in the first degree.
125.60 – Issuing abortional articles.
130.20 – Sexual misconduct.
130.52 – Forcible touching.
130.55 – Sexual abuse in the third degree.
130.60 – Sexual abuse in the second degree.
130.91 – Sexually motivated felony.
135.05 – Unlawful imprisonment in the second degree.
135.36 – Labor trafficking; accomplice.
135.37 – Aggravated labor trafficking.
135.45 – Custodial interference in the second degree.
135.55 – Substitution of children.
135.60 – Coercion in the second degree
140.05 – Trespass.
140.10 – Criminal trespass in the third degree.
140.15 – Criminal trespass in the second degree.
140.20 – Burglary in the third degree.
140.35 – Possession of burglar’s tools.
140.40 – Unlawful possession of radio devices.
145.00 – Criminal mischief in the fourth degree.
145.05 – Criminal mischief in the third degree.
145.10 – Criminal mischief in the second degree.
145.14 – Criminal tampering in the third degree.
145.15 – Criminal tampering in the second degree.
145.20 – Criminal tampering in the first degree.
145.22 – Cemetery desecration in the second degree.
145.23 – Cemetery desecration in the first degree.
145.25 – Reckless endangerment of property.
145.26 – Aggravated cemetery desecration in the second degree.
145.27 – Aggravated cemetery desecration in the first degree.
145.30 – Unlawfully posting advertisements.
145.40 – Tampering with a consumer product in the second degree.
145.45 – Tampering with a consumer product in the first degree.
145.60 – Making graffiti.
145.65 – Possession of graffiti instruments.
145.70 – Criminal possession of a taximeter accelerating device.
150.01 – Arson in the fifth degree.
155.25 – Petit larceny.
155.30 – Grand Larceny in the fourth degree.
155.35 – Grand larceny in the third degree.
155.40 – Grand larceny in the second degree.
155.42 – Grand larceny in the first degree.
155.43 – Aggravated grand larceny of an automated teller machine.
156.05 – Unauthorized use of a computer.
156.10 – Computer trespass.
156.20 – Computer tampering in the fourth degree.
156.25 – Computer tampering in the third degree.
156.26 – Computer tampering in the second degree.
156.27 – Computer tampering in the first degree.
156.29 – Unlawful duplication of computer related material in the second degree.
156.30 – Unlawful duplication of computer related material in the first degree.
156.35 – Criminal possession of computer related material.
156.40 – Operating an unlawful electronic sweepstakes.
158.05 – Welfare fraud in the fifth degree.
158.10 – Welfare fraud in the fourth degree.
158.15 – Welfare fraud in the third degree.
158.20 – Welfare fraud in the second degree.
158.25 – Welfare fraud in the first degree.
158.30 – Criminal use of a public benefit card in the second degree.
158.35 – Criminal use of a public benefit card in the first degree.
158.40 – Criminal possession of public benefit cards in the third degree.
158.45 – Criminal possession of public benefit cards in the second degree.
158.50 – Criminal possession of public benefit cards in the first degree.
165.00 – Misapplication of property.
165.05 – Unauthorized use of a vehicle in the third degree.
165.06 – Unauthorized use of a vehicle in the second degree.
165.07 – Unlawful use of secret scientific material.
165.08 – Unauthorized use of a vehicle in the first degree.
165.09 – Auto stripping in the third degree.
165.10 – Auto stripping in the second degree.
165.11 – Auto stripping in the first degree.
165.15 – Theft of services.
165.16 – Unauthorized sale of certain transportation services.
165.17 – Unlawful use of credit card, debit card or public benefit card.
165.20 – Fraudulently obtaining a signature.
165.25 – Jostling.
165.30 – Fraudulent accosting.
165.35 – Fortune telling.
165.40 – Criminal possession of stolen property in the fifth degree.
165.45 – Criminal possession of stolen property in the fourth degree.
165.50 – Criminal possession of stolen property in the third degree.
165.52 – Criminal possession of stolen property in the second degree.
165.54 – Criminal possession of stolen property in the first degree.
165.71 – Trademark counterfeiting in the third degree.
165.72 – Trademark counterfeiting in the second degree.
165.73 – Trademark counterfeiting in the first degree.
170.05 – Forgery in the third degree.
170.10 – Forgery in the second degree.
170.15 – Forgery in the first degree.
170.20 – Criminal possession of a forged instrument in the third degree.
170.25 – Criminal possession of a forged instrument in the second degree.
170.30 – Criminal possession of a forged instrument in the first degree.
170.40 – Criminal possession of forgery devices.
170.45 – Criminal simulation.
170.47 – Criminal possession of an anti-security item.
170.55 – Unlawfully using slugs in the second degree.
170.60 – Unlawfully using slugs in the first degree.
170.65 – Forgery of a vehicle identification number.
170.70 – Illegal possession of a vehicle identification number.
170.75 – Fraudulent making of an electronic access device in the second degree.
175.05 – Falsifying business records in the second degree.
175.10 – Falsifying business records in the first degree.
175.20 – Tampering with public records in the second degree.
175.25 – Tampering with public records in the first degree.
175.30 – Offering a false instrument for filing in the second degree.
175.35 – Offering a false instrument for filing in the first degree.
175.40 – Issuing a false certificate.
175.45 – Issuing a false financial statement.
176.10 – Insurance fraud in the fifth degree.
176.15 – Insurance fraud in the fourth degree.
176.20 – Insurance fraud in the third degree.
176.25 – Insurance fraud in the second degree.
176.30 – Insurance fraud in the first degree.
176.35 – Aggravated insurance fraud.
176.45 – Life settlement fraud in the fifth degree.
176.50 – Life settlement fraud in the fourth degree.
176.55 – Life settlement fraud in the third degree.
176.60 – Life settlement fraud in the second degree.
176.65 – Life settlement fraud in the first degree.
176.70 – Aggravated life settlement fraud.
177.05 – Health care fraud in the fifth degree.
177.10 – Health care fraud in the fourth degree.
177.15 – Health care fraud in the third degree.
177.20 – Health care fraud in the second degree.
177.25 – Health care fraud in the first degree.
178.10 – Criminal diversion of prescription medications and prescriptions in the fourth degree.
178.15 – Criminal diversion of prescription medications and prescriptions in the third degree.
178.20 – Criminal diversion of prescription medications and prescriptions in the second degree.
178.25 – Criminal diversion of prescription medications and prescriptions in the first degree.
178.26 – Fraud and deceit related to controlled substances.
179.10 – Criminal diversion of medical marihuana in the first degree.
179.11 – Criminal diversion of medical marihuana in the second degree.
179.15 – Criminal retention of medical marihuana.
180.00 – Commercial bribing in the second degree.
180.03 – Commercial bribing in the first degree.
180.05 – Commercial bribe receiving in the second degree.
180.08 – Commercial bribe receiving in the first degree.
180.15 – Bribing a labor official.
180.25 – Bribe receiving by a labor official.
180.40 – Sports bribing.
180.45 – Sports bribe receiving.
180.50 – Tampering with a sports contest in the second degree.
180.51 – Tampering with a sports contest in the first degree.
180.52 – Impairing the integrity of a pari-mutuel betting system in the second degree.
180.53 – Impairing the integrity of a pari-mutuel betting system in the first degree.
180.55 – Rent gouging in the third degree.
180.56 – Rent gouging in the second degree.
180.57 – Rent gouging in the first degree.
185.00 – Fraud in insolvency.
185.05 – Fraud involving a security interest.
185.10 – Fraudulent disposition of mortgaged property.
185.15 – Fraudulent disposition of property subject to a conditional sale contract.
187.05 – Residential mortgage fraud in the fifth degree.
187.10 – Residential mortgage fraud in the fourth degree.
187.15 – Residential mortgage fraud in the third degree.
187.20 – Residential mortgage fraud in the second degree.
187.25 – Residential mortgage fraud in the first degree.
190.05 – Issuing a bad check.
190.20 – False advertising.
190.23 – False personation.
190.25 – Criminal impersonation in the second degree.
190.26 – Criminal impersonation in the first degree.
190.27 – Criminal sale of a police uniform.
190.30 – Unlawfully concealing a will.
190.35 – Misconduct by corporate official.
190.40 – Criminal usury in the second degree.
190.42 – Criminal usury in the first degree.
190.45 – Possession of usurious loan records.
190.50 – Unlawful collection practices.
190.55 – Making a false statement of credit terms.
190.60 – Scheme to defraud in the second degree.
190.65 – Scheme to defraud in the first degree.
190.70 – Scheme to defraud the state by unlawfully selling prescriptions.
190.72 – Unauthorized radio transmission.
190.75 – Criminal use of an access device in the second degree.
190.76 – Criminal use of an access device in the first degree.
190.78 – Identity theft in the third degree.
190.79 – Identity theft in the second degree.
190.80 – Identity theft in the first degree.
190.80-A – Aggravated identity theft.
190.81 – Unlawful possession of personal identification information in the third degree.
190.82 – Unlawful possession of personal identification information in the second degree.
190.83 – Unlawful possession of personal identification information in the first degree.
190.85 – Unlawful possession of a skimmer device in the second degree.
190.86 – Unlawful possession of a skimmer device in the first degree.
190.87 – Immigrant assistant services fraud in the second degree.
190.89 – Immigrant assistance services fraud in the first degree.
195.00 – Official misconduct.
195.02 – Concealment of a human corpse.
195.05 – Obstructing governmental administration in the second degree.
195.06 – Killing or injuring a police animal.
195.06-A – Killing a police work dog or police work horse.
195.10 – Refusing to aid a peace or a police officer.
195.11 – Harming an animal trained to aid a person with a disability in the second degree.
195.12 – Harming an animal trained to aid a person with a disability in the first degree.
195.15 – Obstructing firefighting operations.
195.16 – Obstructing emergency medical services.
195.20 – Defrauding the government.
200.00 – Bribery in the third degree.
200.03 – Bribery in the second degree.
200.04 – Bribery in the first degree.
200.10 – Bribe receiving in the third degree.
200.11 – Bribe receiving in the second degree.
200.12 – Bribe receiving in the first degree.
200.20 – Rewarding official misconduct in the second degree.
200.22 – Rewarding official misconduct in the first degree.
200.25 – Receiving reward for official misconduct in the second degree.
200.27 – Receiving reward for official misconduct in the first degree.
200.30 – Giving unlawful gratuities.
200.35 – Receiving unlawful gratuities.
200.45 – Bribe giving for public office.
200.50 – Bribe receiving for public office.
200.55 – Impairing the integrity of a government licensing examination.
200.56 – Corrupt use of position or authority.
205.05 – Escape in the third degree.
205.10 – Escape in the second degree.
205.15 – Escape in the first degree.
205.16 – Absconding from temporary release in the second degree.
205.17 – Absconding from temporary release in the first degree.
205.18 – Absconding from a furlough program.
205.19 – Absconding from a community treatment facility.
205.20 – Promoting prison contraband in the second degree.
205.25 – Promoting prison contraband in the first degree.
205.30 – Resisting arrest.
205.55 – Hindering prosecution in the third degree.
205.60 – Hindering prosecution in the second degree.
205.65 – Hindering prosecution in the first degree.
210.05 – Perjury in the third degree.
210.10 – Perjury in the second degree.
210.15 – Perjury in the first degree.
210.35 – Making an apparently sworn false statement in the second degree.
210.40 – Making an apparently sworn false statement in the first degree.
210.45 – Making a punishable false written statement.
215.00 – Bribing a witness.
215.05 – Bribe receiving by a witness.
215.10 – Tampering with a witness in the fourth degree.
215.14 – Employer unlawfully penalizing witness or victim.
215.19 – Bribing a juror.
215.20 – Bribe receiving by a juror.
215.22 – Providing a juror with a gratuity.
215.23 – Tampering with a juror in the second degree.
215.25 – Tampering with a juror in the first degree.
215.28 – Misconduct by a juror in the second degree.
215.30 – Misconduct by a juror in the first degree.
215.40 – Tampering with physical evidence.
215.45 – Compounding a crime.
215.50 – Criminal contempt in the second degree.
215.54 – Criminal contempt; prosecution and punishment.
215.55 – Bail jumping in the third degree.
215.56 – Bail jumping in the second degree.
215.57 – Bail jumping in the first degree.
215.58 – Failing to respond to an appearance ticket.
215.60 – Criminal contempt of the legislature.
215.65 – Criminal contempt of a temporary state commission.
215.66 – Criminal contempt of the state commission on judicial conduct.
215.70 – Unlawful grand jury disclosure.
215.75 – Unlawful disclosure of an indictment.
215.80 – Unlawful disposition of assets subject to forfeiture.
220.03 – Criminal possession of a controlled substance in the seventh degree.
220.06 – Criminal possession of a controlled substance in the fifth degree.
220.09 – Criminal possession of a controlled substance in the fourth degree.
220.16 – Criminal possession of a controlled substance in the third degree.
220.31 – Criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fifth degree.
220.34 – Criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fourth degree.
220.39 – Criminal sale of a controlled substance in the third degree.
220.45 – Criminally possessing a hypodermic instrument.
220.46 – Criminal injection of a narcotic drug.
220.50 – Criminally using drug paraphernalia in the second degree.
220.55 – Criminally using drug paraphernalia in the first degree.
220.60 – Criminal possession of precursors of controlled substances.
220.65 – Criminal sale of a prescription for a controlled substance or of a controlled substance by a practitioner
or pharmacist.
220.70 – Criminal possession of methamphetamine manufacturing material in the second degree.
220.71 – Criminal possession of methamphetamine manufacturing material in the first degree.
220.72 – Criminal possession of precursors of methamphetamine.
220.73 – Unlawful manufacture of methamphetamine in the third degree.
220.74 – Unlawful manufacture of methamphetamine in the second degree.
220.75 – Unlawful manufacture of methamphetamine in the first degree.
220.76 – Unlawful disposal of methamphetamine laboratory material.
220.78 – Witness or victim of drug or alcohol overdose.
221.05 – Unlawful possession of marihuana.
221.10 – Criminal possession of marihuana in the fifth degree.
221.15 – Criminal possession of marihuana in the fourth degree.
221.20 – Criminal possession of marihuana in the third degree.
221.25 – Criminal possession of marihuana in the second degree.
221.30 – Criminal possession of marihuana in the first degree.
221.35 – Criminal sale of marihuana in the fifth degree.
221.40 – Criminal sale of marihuana in the fourth degree.
221.45 – Criminal sale of marihuana in the third degree.
221.50 – Criminal sale of marihuana in the second degree.
221.55 – Criminal sale of marihuana in the first degree.
225.05 – Promoting gambling in the second degree.
225.10 – Promoting gambling in the first degree.
225.15 – Possession of gambling records in the second degree.
225.20 – Possession of gambling records in the first degree.
225.30 – Possession of a gambling device.
225.55 – Gaming fraud in the second degree.
225.60 – Gaming fraud in the first degree.
225.65 – Use of counterfeit, unapproved or unlawful wagering instruments.
225.70 – Possession of unlawful gaming property in the third degree.
225.75 – Possession of unlawful gaming property in the second degree.
225.80 – Possession of unlawful gaming property in the first degree.
225.85 – Use of unlawful gaming property.
225.90 – Manipulation of gaming outcomes at an authorized gaming establishment.
225.95 – Unlawful manufacture, sale, distribution, marking, altering or modification of equipment and devices
associated with gaming.
230.00 – Prostitution.
230.03 – Prostitution in a school zone.
230.04 – Patronizing a person for prostitution in the third degree.
230.08 – Patronizing a person for prostitution in a school zone.
230.11 – Aggravated patronizing a minor for prostitution in the third degree.
230.12 – Aggravated patronizing a minor for prostitution in the second degree.
230.13 – Aggravated patronizing a minor for prostitution in the first degree.
230.20 – Promoting prostitution in the fourth degree.
230.25 (1) – Promoting prostitution in the third degree (a business involving two or more individuals for
prostitution, or facilitating travel for patronizing prostitution).
230.35 – Promoting or compelling prostitution; accomplice.
230.36 – Sex trafficking; accomplice.
230.40 – Permitting prostitution.
235.05 – Obscenity in the third degree.
235.06 – Obscenity in the second degree.
235.07 – Obscenity in the first degree.
235.21 – Disseminating indecent material to minors in the second degree.
240.05 – Riot in the second degree.
240.08 – Inciting to riot.
240.10 – Unlawful assembly.
240.15 – Criminal anarchy.
240.20 – Disorderly conduct.
240.21 – Disruption or disturbance of a religious service, funeral, burial or memorial service.
240.25 – Harassment in the first degree.
240.26 – Harassment in the second degree.
240.30 – Aggravated harassment in the second degree.
240.31 – Aggravated harassment in the first degree.
240.32 – Aggravated harassment of an employee by an inmate.
240.35 – Loitering.
240.36 – Loitering in the first degree.
240.37 – Loitering for the purpose of engaging in a prostitution offense.
240.40 – Appearance in public under the influence of narcotics or a drug other than alcohol.
240.45 – Criminal nuisance in the second degree.
240.46 – Criminal nuisance in the first degree.
240.48 – Disseminating a false registered sex offender notice.
240.50 – Falsely reporting an incident in the third degree.
240.65 – Unlawful prevention of public access to records.
240.70 – Criminal interference with health care services or religious worship in the second degree.
240.71 – Criminal interference with health care services or religious worship in the first degree.
240.72 – Aggravated interference with health care services in the second degree.
240.73 – Aggravated interference with health care services in the first degree.
240.76 – Directing a laser at an aircraft in the second degree.
240.77 – Directing a laser at an aircraft in the first degree.
242.05 – Interference, harassment or intimidation of a service animal.
242.10 – Harming a service animal in the second degree.
242.15 – Harming a service animal in the first degree.
245.00 – Public lewdness.
245.01 – Exposure of a person.
245.02 – Promoting the exposure of a person.
245.03 – Public lewdness in the first degree.
245.05 – Offensive exhibition.
245.11 – Public display of offensive sexual material.
250.05 – Eavesdropping.
250.10 – Possession of eavesdropping devices.
250.15 – Failure to report wiretapping.
250.20 – Divulging an eavesdropping warrant.
250.25 – Tampering with private communications.
250.30 – Unlawfully obtaining communications information.
250.35 – Failing to report criminal communications.
250.45 – Unlawful surveillance in the second degree.
250.50 – Unlawful surveillance in the first degree.
250.55 – Dissemination of an unlawful surveillance image in the second degree.
250.60 – Dissemination of an unlawful surveillance image in the first degree.
255.00 – Unlawfully solemnizing a marriage.
255.05 – Unlawfully issuing a dissolution decree.
255.10 – Unlawfully procuring a marriage license.
255.15 – Bigamy.
255.17 – Adultery.
255.25 – Incest in the third degree.
260.00 – Abandonment of a child.
260.05 – Non-support of a child in the second degree.
260.06 – Non-support of a child in the first degree.
260.10 – Endangering the welfare of a child.
260.20 – Unlawfully dealing with a child in the first degree.
260.21 – Unlawfully dealing with a child in the second degree.
260.22 – Facilitating female genital mutilation.
260.24 – Endangering the welfare of an incompetent or physically disabled person in the second degree.
260.31*2 – Misrepresentation by a child day care provider.
265.02 (9) – Criminal possession of a weapon in the third degree (where such person possesses an unloaded
firearm and also commits a drug trafficking felony).
265.02 (10) – Criminal possession of a weapon in the third degree (where such person possesses an unloaded
firearm and also commits any violent felony offense ).
265.05 – Unlawful possession of weapons by persons under sixteen.
265.06 – Unlawful possession of a weapon upon school grounds.
265.35 – Prohibited use of weapons (unless discharged at a moving aircraft or railway vehicle).
265.36 – Unlawful possession of a large capacity ammunition feeding device.
265.37 – Unlawful possession of certain ammunition feeding devices.
265.45 – Safe storage of rifles, shotguns, and firearms.
270.00 – Unlawfully dealing with fireworks and dangerous fireworks.
270.05 – Unlawfully possessing or selling noxious material.
270.10 – Creating a hazard.
270.15 – Unlawfully refusing to yield a party line.
270.20 – Unlawful wearing of a body vest.
270.25 – Unlawful fleeing a police officer in a motor vehicle in the third degree.
275.05 – Manufacture of unauthorized recordings in the second degree.
275.10 – Manufacture of unauthorized recordings in the first degree.
275.15 – Manufacture or sale of an unauthorized recording of a performance in the second degree.
275.20 – Manufacture or sale of an unauthorized recording of a performance in the first degree.
275.25 – Advertisement or sale of unauthorized recordings in the second degree.
275.30 – Advertisement or sale of unauthorized recordings in the first degree.
275.32 – Unlawful operation of a recording device in a motion picture or live theater in the third degree.
275.33 – Unlawful operation of a recording device in a motion picture or live theater in the second degree.
275.34 – Unlawful operation of a recording device in a motion picture or live theater in the first degree.
275.35 – Failure to disclose the origin of a recording in the second degree.
275.40 – Failure to disclose the origin of a recording in the first degree.
405.12 – Unpermitted use of indoor pyrotechnics in the second degree.
405.14 – Unpermitted use of indoor pyrotechnics in the first degree.
405.16 (2) – Aggravated unpermitted use of indoor pyrotechnics in the second degree (damage to property
exceeding $250).
460.20 – Enterprise corruption.
470.05 – Money laundering in the fourth degree.
470.10 – Money laundering in the third degree.
470.15 – Money laundering in the second degree.
470.20 – Money laundering in the first degree.
496.02 – Corrupting the government in the fourth degree.
496.03 – Corrupting the government in the third degree.
496.04 – Corrupting the government in the second degree.
496.05 – Corrupting the government in the first degree.
496.06 – Public corruption.

MALLIOTAKIS JOINS BIPARTISAN EFFORT TO STOP CUTS TO SENIOR CENTERS

by Malliotakis on | Featured

TitleXXFunding.03082017

Assemblywoman Nicole Malliotakis joins Assembly colleagues to express bipartisan opposition to shift in Title XX funding.

Assemblywoman Nicole Malliotakis (R,C,I-Brooklyn/Staten Island) joined Assemblywoman Donna Lupardo (D-Binghamton), Assemblyman Andrew Hevesi (D,WF-Queens), Assemblywoman Ellen Jaffee (D-Suffern), and aging advocates at a press conference today to express bipartisan opposition to the proposed shift in Title XX funding in the Executive Budget and advocate for restoration of the funds in the final budget. The proposed shift will move $27 million in discretionary funding the City of New York currently uses to fund its senior centers to cover a proposed cut in child care subsidies. The City estimates this shift will result in the closure of 65 senior centers, affecting nearly 6,000 seniors per day. At Wednesday’s news conference, 17,000 pieces of paper were presented to signify the massive letter writing campaign undertaken by seniors who will be directly affected by the proposal.  17,000 letters in opposition were sent to Governor Cuomo from senior citizens around New York City.

 

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Assemblywoman Nicole Malliotakis looks on with Assemblywoman Helene E. Weinstein (D-Brooklyn) as the 17,000 pieces of paper were presented to signify the massive letter writing campaign undertaken by seniors who will be directly affected by the proposal.  

Malliotakis acknowledged the importance of supporting child care, but doesn’t believe it is right to strip money away from our aging population given the significant role senior centers play in our communities.

“I think we can all agree there is a need to support child care, but it is equally important that we ensure our aging population is not overlooked. Senior centers are a treasured resource in our communities and we cannot allow them to close because the governor decided to pull a bait-and-switch on the backs of seniors. Our senior citizens helped build our communities, paid taxes their entire lives and have earned the programs they currently enjoy. If there is one place we shouldn’t be looking to cut spending, it’s senior services. I will continue to work with my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to oppose the proposed shift in Title XX funding in the budget to ensure our senior citizens programs stay intact,” said Malliotakis.

The Legislature has until April 1, 2017 to approve the final budget.

SENATOR GOLDEN AND ASSEMBLYWOMAN MALLIOTAKIS ISSUE STATEMENT CALLING FOR FUNDING FOR SENIOR SERVICES TO BE MAINTAINED

by Malliotakis on | Featured
New York – State Senator Martin J. Golden (R-C-I, Brooklyn), a former Chairman of the State Senate Aging Committee, and Assemblywoman Nicole Malliotakis (R-C, Brooklyn, Staten Island) today are calling on Governor Andrew M. Cuomo to preserve Title XX funding in this year’s State budget to maintain vital senior services and keep senior centers open throughout the five boroughs.
“I am urging Governor Andrew Cuomo not to cut Title XX funding for senior centers in this year’s New York State budget. I agree that we need more money for childcare services but we must not adversely impact New York’s senior population and the services they deserve.  We had this same fight before and we were successful in saving senior centers from closing. I will continue to be on the front lines of this battle fighting for our seniors and fighting for our children. I will not vote for any budget that does not financially support important senior services and vital childcare services,” said Senator Marty Golden.
“It is outrageous that despite this year’s budget increasing, Governor Cuomo is looking to shortchange seniors by diverting funding for senior centers.  I will not stand aside while senior centers in my community risk seeing their doors closed.  These seniors have spent their entire lives paying taxes and building our community, and government has an obligation to ensure that their needs are properly met.  I will continue to fight alongside Senator Golden to ensure our senior centers remain open and
funded,” said Assemblywoman Nicole Malliotakis.
The planned reductions proposed by Governor Cuomo would eliminate more than $17 million from New York City senior centers and force the New York City to close more than 65 senior centers.

Citywide Ferry Great for Bay Ridge, Slights Staten Island

by Malliotakis on | Featured

“New York is a city of waterways, and it makes absolute sense to take advantage of this unique attribute as we continue looking for quicker, more efficient ways to facilitate the movement of people among the boroughs.  The Citywide Ferry system is a bold and visionary approach to making our city more interconnected.  My constituents in Bay Ridge face one of the most arduous daily commutes in the country, so I’m extremely pleased that ferry service will now make its return to the community.  It was a primary means for travel to and from Manhattan in the 1980s and 1990s, and is most welcome to alleviate crowded subway and express buses with lengthy commute times.  It is, however, equally disappointing, and unacceptable, that the people of Staten Island are being left out of this new ‘citywide’ ferry system.   While the most famous ferry in the world is the Staten Island Ferry, it is a far distance from communities on the opposite shores of Staten Island and, following Hurricane Sandy, a temporary ferry service from Great Kills was added much to the delight of commuters.   A true ‘citywide’ ferry should include all five boroughs and an additional ferry for Staten Islanders, which would be vital to reducing unreasonably long commute times from some of the most transportation-starved communities in our city.”